• HenDough Chicken and Donuts

  • WHY I BOUGHT

HenDough Is Looking for Passionate, Community-Oriented Franchisees To Grow the Brand in Markets Across the Country

The chicken and donut restaurant offers prospects the opportunity to get involved in their local business community, enjoy a flexible work/life balance and generate impressive revenue.

HenDough, the North Carolina-based chicken and donut restaurant brand, is gearing up for some serious growth. The HenDough concept, which was started in 2016 by restaurant industry veterans Paul and Sarah Klaassen, has showed consistent momentum over the past five years, including a steady 10% increase in year-over-year revenue and the addition of a second location in Greenville

Now, the Klaassens are looking to continue this growth, but they can’t do it on their own. The Klaassens are launching the HenDough franchise to partner with qualified prospects who have a passion for bringing chef-driven menus and a vibrant atmosphere to their community.

Franchisees Should Align With HenDough’s Community-Oriented Approach

Paul and Sarah met while working at the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, where they were primarily serving tourists and finding it difficult to build long-lasting customer relationships. When they decided to leave the upscale hospitality world and start their own restaurant, Sarah and Paul knew they wanted to get involved in the community by supporting local organizations and serving the same people everyday. 

That is exactly what they did with HenDough, generating a dedicated fan base in the area with a unique pairing of fried chicken and gourmet, made-from-scratch donuts. The first year the Hendersonville location opened, the Klaassens exceeded their expectations in revenue by 50% and have continued to see double-digit increases in year-over-year revenue. 

In order to replicate this success, the Klaassens say HenDough franchisees will need to bring established local ties to their community. “The ideal HenDough franchisee is someone who is heavily involved in their community and is able to spread the word about the concept,” said Sarah. “In a lot of ways, our ideal franchisees are just like us.”

The community-oriented approach isn’t just for satisfying customers — to source products, HenDough also partners with local vendors, businesses, breweries and dairy farms. The Klaassens hope to find franchisees who will be excited to support their local business community through these types of mutually-beneficial partnerships.

Franchisees Should Bring a Passion for the Brand and Restaurant Industry

For the first few locations, Sarah says franchisees will ideally have some experience in the restaurant industry and should be willing to be part of the day-to-day operations. The team is currently looking for single-unit operators to start, but these owners will someday be able to evolve into multi-unit owners.

Although franchisees will want to be hands-on at first, the Klaassens say the HenDough model doesn’t necessarily require a daily presence and can therefore lend itself to a more flexible work/life balance as owners gain experience. For example, after opening their second location, Paul and Sarah moved to the Greenville area as a way to be closer to the new restaurant and saw first-hand that the original HenDough location was succeeding without them being there everyday.

“We’ve had the most time off together since starting our own company,” said Sarah. “We realized we could step back and the restaurant would continue to run smoothly — our team allows us to focus on growth while the managers take care of the day-to-day operations.” 

The first few incoming franchise owners will also have direct access to the Klaassens’ expertise and hands-on support. Paul and Sarah plan on opening a brand new, flagship HenDough store in Greenville, where the first few franchisees can come to attend Discovery Day and go through a robust training program.

Franchisees Will Be Able To Pivot Quickly and Benefit From Flexible Real Estate Opportunities

Sarah notes the ideal HenDough franchisee will also be flexible and capable of adapting to unexpected challenges. For example, when the COVID-19 pandemic hit, the Klaassens knew they had to pivot to off-premise service and even took the time to remodel the Hendersonville restaurant and add dinner and burgers to the menu. This quick thinking helped the Hendersonville restaurant see its best sales year yet in 2020.

Another area is which franchisees will have the chance to be flexible is with real estate. The team is uniquely prepared to help franchisees thrive in nontraditional sites since the restaurant has already succeeded in both a 100-year-old house and a food hall. Franchisees will have the opportunity to retain the personality of the brand while also benefiting from an affordable, relatively small average footprint of 2,500-3,500 square feet. 

Now, the Klaassens have identified a few specific target markets primed for growth, including room for eight to 10 stores in the Carolinas, as well as potential in the nearby states of Florida, Georgia and Tennessee. 

“In the next five to 10 years, we hope to open one or two new corporate stores, as well as double our footprint every year through franchising,” said Paul. “We’ve received a lot of questions about franchising over the years, and we’re excited to find qualified prospects to help us bring HenDough to new communities across the country.”

The total initial investment required to open a HenDough restaurant is $205,500-$643,500 (multi-developmental initial investment $235-500-$778,500). The initial franchise fee is $30,000 for one establishment and $15,000 for each additional restaurant. For more information, visit: https://hendough.com/franchise/

MAKE IT TREND
MORE BRAND INFO
  • NAME

    HenDough Chicken and Donuts

  • NO. OF UNITS CURRENTLY OPEN:

    2

  • start-up costs

    $205,500-$643,500

  • FRANCHISE FEE:

    $30,000

  • ROYALTY:

    6% of Gross Sales

INQUIRE ABOUT SERVICES
  • HenDough Chicken and Donuts

  • WHY I BOUGHT

HenDough Is Looking for Passionate, Community-Oriented Franchisees To Grow the Brand in Markets Across the Country

The chicken and donut restaurant offers prospects the opportunity to get involved in their local business community, enjoy a flexible work/life balance and generate impressive revenue.

HenDough, the North Carolina-based chicken and donut restaurant brand, is gearing up for some serious growth. The HenDough concept, which was started in 2016 by restaurant industry veterans Paul and Sarah Klaassen, has showed consistent momentum over the past five years, including a steady 10% increase in year-over-year revenue and the addition of a second location in Greenville

Now, the Klaassens are looking to continue this growth, but they can’t do it on their own. The Klaassens are launching the HenDough franchise to partner with qualified prospects who have a passion for bringing chef-driven menus and a vibrant atmosphere to their community.

Franchisees Should Align With HenDough’s Community-Oriented Approach

Paul and Sarah met while working at the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, where they were primarily serving tourists and finding it difficult to build long-lasting customer relationships. When they decided to leave the upscale hospitality world and start their own restaurant, Sarah and Paul knew they wanted to get involved in the community by supporting local organizations and serving the same people everyday. 

That is exactly what they did with HenDough, generating a dedicated fan base in the area with a unique pairing of fried chicken and gourmet, made-from-scratch donuts. The first year the Hendersonville location opened, the Klaassens exceeded their expectations in revenue by 50% and have continued to see double-digit increases in year-over-year revenue. 

In order to replicate this success, the Klaassens say HenDough franchisees will need to bring established local ties to their community. “The ideal HenDough franchisee is someone who is heavily involved in their community and is able to spread the word about the concept,” said Sarah. “In a lot of ways, our ideal franchisees are just like us.”

The community-oriented approach isn’t just for satisfying customers — to source products, HenDough also partners with local vendors, businesses, breweries and dairy farms. The Klaassens hope to find franchisees who will be excited to support their local business community through these types of mutually-beneficial partnerships.

Franchisees Should Bring a Passion for the Brand and Restaurant Industry

For the first few locations, Sarah says franchisees will ideally have some experience in the restaurant industry and should be willing to be part of the day-to-day operations. The team is currently looking for single-unit operators to start, but these owners will someday be able to evolve into multi-unit owners.

Although franchisees will want to be hands-on at first, the Klaassens say the HenDough model doesn’t necessarily require a daily presence and can therefore lend itself to a more flexible work/life balance as owners gain experience. For example, after opening their second location, Paul and Sarah moved to the Greenville area as a way to be closer to the new restaurant and saw first-hand that the original HenDough location was succeeding without them being there everyday.

“We’ve had the most time off together since starting our own company,” said Sarah. “We realized we could step back and the restaurant would continue to run smoothly — our team allows us to focus on growth while the managers take care of the day-to-day operations.” 

The first few incoming franchise owners will also have direct access to the Klaassens’ expertise and hands-on support. Paul and Sarah plan on opening a brand new, flagship HenDough store in Greenville, where the first few franchisees can come to attend Discovery Day and go through a robust training program.

Franchisees Will Be Able To Pivot Quickly and Benefit From Flexible Real Estate Opportunities

Sarah notes the ideal HenDough franchisee will also be flexible and capable of adapting to unexpected challenges. For example, when the COVID-19 pandemic hit, the Klaassens knew they had to pivot to off-premise service and even took the time to remodel the Hendersonville restaurant and add dinner and burgers to the menu. This quick thinking helped the Hendersonville restaurant see its best sales year yet in 2020.

Another area is which franchisees will have the chance to be flexible is with real estate. The team is uniquely prepared to help franchisees thrive in nontraditional sites since the restaurant has already succeeded in both a 100-year-old house and a food hall. Franchisees will have the opportunity to retain the personality of the brand while also benefiting from an affordable, relatively small average footprint of 2,500-3,500 square feet. 

Now, the Klaassens have identified a few specific target markets primed for growth, including room for eight to 10 stores in the Carolinas, as well as potential in the nearby states of Florida, Georgia and Tennessee. 

“In the next five to 10 years, we hope to open one or two new corporate stores, as well as double our footprint every year through franchising,” said Paul. “We’ve received a lot of questions about franchising over the years, and we’re excited to find qualified prospects to help us bring HenDough to new communities across the country.”

The total initial investment required to open a HenDough restaurant is $205,500-$643,500 (multi-developmental initial investment $235-500-$778,500). The initial franchise fee is $30,000 for one establishment and $15,000 for each additional restaurant. For more information, visit: https://hendough.com/franchise/

MAKE IT TREND
MORE BRAND INFO
  • NAME

    HenDough Chicken and Donuts

  • NO. OF UNITS CURRENTLY OPEN:

    2

  • start-up costs

    $205,500-$643,500

  • FRANCHISE FEE:

    $30,000

  • ROYALTY:

    6% of Gross Sales

INQUIRE ABOUT SERVICES
  • HenDough Chicken and Donuts

  • WHY I BOUGHT

HenDough Is Looking for Passionate, Community-Oriented Franchisees To Grow the Brand in Markets Across the Country

The chicken and donut restaurant offers prospects the opportunity to get involved in their local business community, enjoy a flexible work/life balance and generate impressive revenue.

HenDough, the North Carolina-based chicken and donut restaurant brand, is gearing up for some serious growth. The HenDough concept, which was started in 2016 by restaurant industry veterans Paul and Sarah Klaassen, has showed consistent momentum over the past five years, including a steady 10% increase in year-over-year revenue and the addition of a second location in Greenville

Now, the Klaassens are looking to continue this growth, but they can’t do it on their own. The Klaassens are launching the HenDough franchise to partner with qualified prospects who have a passion for bringing chef-driven menus and a vibrant atmosphere to their community.

Franchisees Should Align With HenDough’s Community-Oriented Approach

Paul and Sarah met while working at the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, where they were primarily serving tourists and finding it difficult to build long-lasting customer relationships. When they decided to leave the upscale hospitality world and start their own restaurant, Sarah and Paul knew they wanted to get involved in the community by supporting local organizations and serving the same people everyday. 

That is exactly what they did with HenDough, generating a dedicated fan base in the area with a unique pairing of fried chicken and gourmet, made-from-scratch donuts. The first year the Hendersonville location opened, the Klaassens exceeded their expectations in revenue by 50% and have continued to see double-digit increases in year-over-year revenue. 

In order to replicate this success, the Klaassens say HenDough franchisees will need to bring established local ties to their community. “The ideal HenDough franchisee is someone who is heavily involved in their community and is able to spread the word about the concept,” said Sarah. “In a lot of ways, our ideal franchisees are just like us.”

The community-oriented approach isn’t just for satisfying customers — to source products, HenDough also partners with local vendors, businesses, breweries and dairy farms. The Klaassens hope to find franchisees who will be excited to support their local business community through these types of mutually-beneficial partnerships.

Franchisees Should Bring a Passion for the Brand and Restaurant Industry

For the first few locations, Sarah says franchisees will ideally have some experience in the restaurant industry and should be willing to be part of the day-to-day operations. The team is currently looking for single-unit operators to start, but these owners will someday be able to evolve into multi-unit owners.

Although franchisees will want to be hands-on at first, the Klaassens say the HenDough model doesn’t necessarily require a daily presence and can therefore lend itself to a more flexible work/life balance as owners gain experience. For example, after opening their second location, Paul and Sarah moved to the Greenville area as a way to be closer to the new restaurant and saw first-hand that the original HenDough location was succeeding without them being there everyday.

“We’ve had the most time off together since starting our own company,” said Sarah. “We realized we could step back and the restaurant would continue to run smoothly — our team allows us to focus on growth while the managers take care of the day-to-day operations.” 

The first few incoming franchise owners will also have direct access to the Klaassens’ expertise and hands-on support. Paul and Sarah plan on opening a brand new, flagship HenDough store in Greenville, where the first few franchisees can come to attend Discovery Day and go through a robust training program.

Franchisees Will Be Able To Pivot Quickly and Benefit From Flexible Real Estate Opportunities

Sarah notes the ideal HenDough franchisee will also be flexible and capable of adapting to unexpected challenges. For example, when the COVID-19 pandemic hit, the Klaassens knew they had to pivot to off-premise service and even took the time to remodel the Hendersonville restaurant and add dinner and burgers to the menu. This quick thinking helped the Hendersonville restaurant see its best sales year yet in 2020.

Another area is which franchisees will have the chance to be flexible is with real estate. The team is uniquely prepared to help franchisees thrive in nontraditional sites since the restaurant has already succeeded in both a 100-year-old house and a food hall. Franchisees will have the opportunity to retain the personality of the brand while also benefiting from an affordable, relatively small average footprint of 2,500-3,500 square feet. 

Now, the Klaassens have identified a few specific target markets primed for growth, including room for eight to 10 stores in the Carolinas, as well as potential in the nearby states of Florida, Georgia and Tennessee. 

“In the next five to 10 years, we hope to open one or two new corporate stores, as well as double our footprint every year through franchising,” said Paul. “We’ve received a lot of questions about franchising over the years, and we’re excited to find qualified prospects to help us bring HenDough to new communities across the country.”

The total initial investment required to open a HenDough restaurant is $205,500-$643,500 (multi-developmental initial investment $235-500-$778,500). The initial franchise fee is $30,000 for one establishment and $15,000 for each additional restaurant. For more information, visit: https://hendough.com/franchise/

MAKE IT TREND
MORE BRAND INFO
  • NAME

    HenDough Chicken and Donuts

  • NO. OF UNITS CURRENTLY OPEN:

    2

  • start-up costs

    $205,500-$643,500

  • FRANCHISE FEE:

    $30,000

  • ROYALTY:

    6% of Gross Sales

INQUIRE ABOUT SERVICES
  • HenDough Chicken and Donuts

  • WHY I BOUGHT

HenDough Is Looking for Passionate, Community-Oriented Franchisees To Grow the Brand in Markets Across the Country

The chicken and donut restaurant offers prospects the opportunity to get involved in their local business community, enjoy a flexible work/life balance and generate impressive revenue.

HenDough, the North Carolina-based chicken and donut restaurant brand, is gearing up for some serious growth. The HenDough concept, which was started in 2016 by restaurant industry veterans Paul and Sarah Klaassen, has showed consistent momentum over the past five years, including a steady 10% increase in year-over-year revenue and the addition of a second location in Greenville

Now, the Klaassens are looking to continue this growth, but they can’t do it on their own. The Klaassens are launching the HenDough franchise to partner with qualified prospects who have a passion for bringing chef-driven menus and a vibrant atmosphere to their community.

Franchisees Should Align With HenDough’s Community-Oriented Approach

Paul and Sarah met while working at the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, where they were primarily serving tourists and finding it difficult to build long-lasting customer relationships. When they decided to leave the upscale hospitality world and start their own restaurant, Sarah and Paul knew they wanted to get involved in the community by supporting local organizations and serving the same people everyday. 

That is exactly what they did with HenDough, generating a dedicated fan base in the area with a unique pairing of fried chicken and gourmet, made-from-scratch donuts. The first year the Hendersonville location opened, the Klaassens exceeded their expectations in revenue by 50% and have continued to see double-digit increases in year-over-year revenue. 

In order to replicate this success, the Klaassens say HenDough franchisees will need to bring established local ties to their community. “The ideal HenDough franchisee is someone who is heavily involved in their community and is able to spread the word about the concept,” said Sarah. “In a lot of ways, our ideal franchisees are just like us.”

The community-oriented approach isn’t just for satisfying customers — to source products, HenDough also partners with local vendors, businesses, breweries and dairy farms. The Klaassens hope to find franchisees who will be excited to support their local business community through these types of mutually-beneficial partnerships.

Franchisees Should Bring a Passion for the Brand and Restaurant Industry

For the first few locations, Sarah says franchisees will ideally have some experience in the restaurant industry and should be willing to be part of the day-to-day operations. The team is currently looking for single-unit operators to start, but these owners will someday be able to evolve into multi-unit owners.

Although franchisees will want to be hands-on at first, the Klaassens say the HenDough model doesn’t necessarily require a daily presence and can therefore lend itself to a more flexible work/life balance as owners gain experience. For example, after opening their second location, Paul and Sarah moved to the Greenville area as a way to be closer to the new restaurant and saw first-hand that the original HenDough location was succeeding without them being there everyday.

“We’ve had the most time off together since starting our own company,” said Sarah. “We realized we could step back and the restaurant would continue to run smoothly — our team allows us to focus on growth while the managers take care of the day-to-day operations.” 

The first few incoming franchise owners will also have direct access to the Klaassens’ expertise and hands-on support. Paul and Sarah plan on opening a brand new, flagship HenDough store in Greenville, where the first few franchisees can come to attend Discovery Day and go through a robust training program.

Franchisees Will Be Able To Pivot Quickly and Benefit From Flexible Real Estate Opportunities

Sarah notes the ideal HenDough franchisee will also be flexible and capable of adapting to unexpected challenges. For example, when the COVID-19 pandemic hit, the Klaassens knew they had to pivot to off-premise service and even took the time to remodel the Hendersonville restaurant and add dinner and burgers to the menu. This quick thinking helped the Hendersonville restaurant see its best sales year yet in 2020.

Another area is which franchisees will have the chance to be flexible is with real estate. The team is uniquely prepared to help franchisees thrive in nontraditional sites since the restaurant has already succeeded in both a 100-year-old house and a food hall. Franchisees will have the opportunity to retain the personality of the brand while also benefiting from an affordable, relatively small average footprint of 2,500-3,500 square feet. 

Now, the Klaassens have identified a few specific target markets primed for growth, including room for eight to 10 stores in the Carolinas, as well as potential in the nearby states of Florida, Georgia and Tennessee. 

“In the next five to 10 years, we hope to open one or two new corporate stores, as well as double our footprint every year through franchising,” said Paul. “We’ve received a lot of questions about franchising over the years, and we’re excited to find qualified prospects to help us bring HenDough to new communities across the country.”

The total initial investment required to open a HenDough restaurant is $205,500-$643,500 (multi-developmental initial investment $235-500-$778,500). The initial franchise fee is $30,000 for one establishment and $15,000 for each additional restaurant. For more information, visit: https://hendough.com/franchise/

MAKE IT TREND
MORE BRAND INFO
  • NAME

    HenDough Chicken and Donuts

  • NO. OF UNITS CURRENTLY OPEN:

    2

  • start-up costs

    $205,500-$643,500

  • FRANCHISE FEE:

    $30,000

  • ROYALTY:

    6% of Gross Sales

INQUIRE ABOUT SERVICES
  • HenDough Chicken and Donuts

  • WHY I BOUGHT

HenDough Is Looking for Passionate, Community-Oriented Franchisees To Grow the Brand in Markets Across the Country

The chicken and donut restaurant offers prospects the opportunity to get involved in their local business community, enjoy a flexible work/life balance and generate impressive revenue.

HenDough, the North Carolina-based chicken and donut restaurant brand, is gearing up for some serious growth. The HenDough concept, which was started in 2016 by restaurant industry veterans Paul and Sarah Klaassen, has showed consistent momentum over the past five years, including a steady 10% increase in year-over-year revenue and the addition of a second location in Greenville

Now, the Klaassens are looking to continue this growth, but they can’t do it on their own. The Klaassens are launching the HenDough franchise to partner with qualified prospects who have a passion for bringing chef-driven menus and a vibrant atmosphere to their community.

Franchisees Should Align With HenDough’s Community-Oriented Approach

Paul and Sarah met while working at the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, where they were primarily serving tourists and finding it difficult to build long-lasting customer relationships. When they decided to leave the upscale hospitality world and start their own restaurant, Sarah and Paul knew they wanted to get involved in the community by supporting local organizations and serving the same people everyday. 

That is exactly what they did with HenDough, generating a dedicated fan base in the area with a unique pairing of fried chicken and gourmet, made-from-scratch donuts. The first year the Hendersonville location opened, the Klaassens exceeded their expectations in revenue by 50% and have continued to see double-digit increases in year-over-year revenue. 

In order to replicate this success, the Klaassens say HenDough franchisees will need to bring established local ties to their community. “The ideal HenDough franchisee is someone who is heavily involved in their community and is able to spread the word about the concept,” said Sarah. “In a lot of ways, our ideal franchisees are just like us.”

The community-oriented approach isn’t just for satisfying customers — to source products, HenDough also partners with local vendors, businesses, breweries and dairy farms. The Klaassens hope to find franchisees who will be excited to support their local business community through these types of mutually-beneficial partnerships.

Franchisees Should Bring a Passion for the Brand and Restaurant Industry

For the first few locations, Sarah says franchisees will ideally have some experience in the restaurant industry and should be willing to be part of the day-to-day operations. The team is currently looking for single-unit operators to start, but these owners will someday be able to evolve into multi-unit owners.

Although franchisees will want to be hands-on at first, the Klaassens say the HenDough model doesn’t necessarily require a daily presence and can therefore lend itself to a more flexible work/life balance as owners gain experience. For example, after opening their second location, Paul and Sarah moved to the Greenville area as a way to be closer to the new restaurant and saw first-hand that the original HenDough location was succeeding without them being there everyday.

“We’ve had the most time off together since starting our own company,” said Sarah. “We realized we could step back and the restaurant would continue to run smoothly — our team allows us to focus on growth while the managers take care of the day-to-day operations.” 

The first few incoming franchise owners will also have direct access to the Klaassens’ expertise and hands-on support. Paul and Sarah plan on opening a brand new, flagship HenDough store in Greenville, where the first few franchisees can come to attend Discovery Day and go through a robust training program.

Franchisees Will Be Able To Pivot Quickly and Benefit From Flexible Real Estate Opportunities

Sarah notes the ideal HenDough franchisee will also be flexible and capable of adapting to unexpected challenges. For example, when the COVID-19 pandemic hit, the Klaassens knew they had to pivot to off-premise service and even took the time to remodel the Hendersonville restaurant and add dinner and burgers to the menu. This quick thinking helped the Hendersonville restaurant see its best sales year yet in 2020.

Another area is which franchisees will have the chance to be flexible is with real estate. The team is uniquely prepared to help franchisees thrive in nontraditional sites since the restaurant has already succeeded in both a 100-year-old house and a food hall. Franchisees will have the opportunity to retain the personality of the brand while also benefiting from an affordable, relatively small average footprint of 2,500-3,500 square feet. 

Now, the Klaassens have identified a few specific target markets primed for growth, including room for eight to 10 stores in the Carolinas, as well as potential in the nearby states of Florida, Georgia and Tennessee. 

“In the next five to 10 years, we hope to open one or two new corporate stores, as well as double our footprint every year through franchising,” said Paul. “We’ve received a lot of questions about franchising over the years, and we’re excited to find qualified prospects to help us bring HenDough to new communities across the country.”

The total initial investment required to open a HenDough restaurant is $205,500-$643,500 (multi-developmental initial investment $235-500-$778,500). The initial franchise fee is $30,000 for one establishment and $15,000 for each additional restaurant. For more information, visit: https://hendough.com/franchise/

MAKE IT TREND
MORE BRAND INFO
  • NAME

    HenDough Chicken and Donuts

  • NO. OF UNITS CURRENTLY OPEN:

    2

  • start-up costs

    $205,500-$643,500

  • FRANCHISE FEE:

    $30,000

  • ROYALTY:

    6% of Gross Sales

INQUIRE ABOUT SERVICES