Layne's Chicken Fingers Franchise Information

READY NOW? LET’S GET STARTED!

When do you envision becoming a franchise owner?
Do you have $300,000 without the bank to invest?

* Not An Offer To Sell a Franchise This website and the information contained on this website is for information purposes only, is not intended as an offer to sell a franchise or a solicitation of an offer to buy a franchise. The offering of a franchise can be made by prospectus only in the form of a Franchise Disclosure Document. In the states of California, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin we will not offer you a franchise unless and until we have complied with applicable pre-sale registration and/or disclosure requirements. In the State of New York, the offering of a franchise can be made only by a prospectus that has been previously filed and registered with the Department of Law of the State of New York. The application for registration of an offering prospectus or the acceptance and filing thereof by the Department of Law does not constitute approval of the offering or the sale of such franchise by the Department of Law or the attorney general of the State of New York.

ABOUT LAYNE'S CHICKEN FINGERS

Founded in 1994 in College Station, the original location became a Texas A&M legend known for its small-town charm, friendly service, iconic chicken fingers and secret sauce. While opening corporate locations across the Dallas-Fort Worth area, the leadership team focused on fine tuning its operations and starting to franchise. Franchise opportunities range from $446,500 to $1,015,000 with different buildout options available.

  • How much it costs
  • Why Layne’s? / Why Now?
  • What Sets Layne’s Chicken Fingers Apart?
  • Why You?
  • Why Franchisees Love the Brand
$446,500 to $1,015,000
Start-Up Cost
$42,500 to $45,000
Initial Franchise Fee
5%
Royalty

* Not An Offer To Sell a Franchise This website and the information contained on this website is for information purposes only, is not intended as an offer to sell a franchise or a solicitation of an offer to buy a franchise. The offering of a franchise can be made by prospectus only in the form of a Franchise Disclosure Document. In the states of California, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin we will not offer you a franchise unless and until we have complied with applicable pre-sale registration and/or disclosure requirements. In the State of New York, the offering of a franchise can be made only by a prospectus that has been previously filed and registered with the Department of Law of the State of New York. The application for registration of an offering prospectus or the acceptance and filing thereof by the Department of Law does not constitute approval of the offering or the sale of such franchise by the Department of Law or the attorney general of the State of New York.

Layne’s was founded in 1994, and it quickly became a fan-favorite in College Station, Texas. Known best for its friendly service, crispy chicken fingers and flavorful secret sauce, the brand is on a mission to bring its Soon to be Famous™ chicken fingers to even more people nationwide by partnering with passionate franchisees.

“Our goal is to make Layne’s a household name, and we will help our franchisees bring our culture of delivering perfect food with outstanding service each and every order, guaranteeing return customers who can’t get enough,” said Garrett Reed, CEO of Layne’s. “We have the right brand at the right time to achieve major growth. We’re looking for franchise partners with the drive and ambition to help us do that.”

With 16 restaurants open and another 226 sold, Layne’s is quickly laying the groundwork for a nationwide takeover. While the team is still interested in dominating the market in its home state of Texas, the restaurant is also growing in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Virginia and DC. 

As visibility increases, demand from both guests and franchisees follows. Layne’s is currently experiencing exponential growth;  entrepreneurs who are interested in joining the system have an opportunity to inquire and begin the development process before prime territories in their markets have been claimed.

The Layne’s business model presents a unique opportunity for owners and guests alike. 

In the rapidly growing fast food chicken market, very few restaurants provide the level of quality and service that Layne’s does. Guests are far more likely to return to Layne’s, even when there are multiple chicken options available in the area. That’s how the brand has grown its raving fan base and why Layne’s owners everywhere continue to enjoy reliable repeat business.

However, the small-town feel that Layne’s offers doesn’t detract from the strength of the model and powerful leadership team. 

Franchisees who join the system will benefit from decades of combined experience in the leadership team, a proven business model and a modern flexibility that keeps Layne’s current without sacrificing what makes the model special. 

Layne’s has worked diligently to create a flexible real estate model, embracing drive-thru-only, in-line, endcap and stand-alone locations. Further, Chief Operating Officer Samir Wattar has leveraged years of operational experience to create a smooth, efficient operating model that helps owners thrive.

“We knew we needed to create systems that would allow us to take the brand to franchisees,” said Wattar. “The voice of the brand, systems, supply chain and the way that we market were all finalized a few years ago, and more recently, we began to look at product offerings that would differentiate us and take us to the next level. Now, franchisees have a polished outline to follow that helps them create the same success the very first Layne’s locations saw.”

You are ready to break into a high-demand industry with an iconic brand and a leadership team that will support your continued growth.

Franchising with Layne’s is a prime opportunity to build a more flexible, fulfilling life for yourself while establishing a go-to restaurant option in your own community.

As it grows, the Layne’s team is looking to partner with franchisees who will fully embrace and protect the Layne’s brand and way, staying true to the business model, culture and practices that have driven its success to this point.

Layne’s is a prime investment for both new owners and seasoned entrepreneurs looking to expand their portfolios. Masroor Fatany, a multi-unit franchisee with Halal Guys, chose to expand his empire with Layne’s, becoming the brand’s first franchisee and opening locations in Katy, Beaumont and Houston.

“Franchising always made sense to me because, growing up, I saw the struggle with starting out as a new brand,” he said. “With a franchise, you have the blueprint, the brand and the customer recognition. That just makes things a lot easier for a midsize franchisee like me.”

As he investigated Layne’s and began to establish his own locations, Fatany only became more impressed with the brand’s culture, model and support. 

“I’ve been looking for another concept for some time, but I wanted to find a brand that I really enjoyed. I didn’t want to open just another Popeye’s. Brands like that are very established, and I wanted to make my own impact as an operator.”

Executive Q&A

Supply Chain Success Propels Layne’s Chicken Fingers Toward Goal of 8–10 Openings in 2022Supply Chain Success Propels Layne’s Chicken Fingers Toward Goal of 8–10 Op...

Layne’s Chicken Fingers: Executive Q&A, Samir Wattar, COO

1851 Franchise: What is your backstory? How did you fall into franchising?

Samir WattarI’ve been in restaurants all of my career, and I’ve always wanted to be in franchising. There is a reward in seeing people succeed. When I wanted to get involved in franchising, one of my mentors said, “You want to get into franchising? One thing you need to understand is that, when you go home, your wife will ask, ‘How was your day?’ When the franchisee goes home, his wife will ask, ‘How were sales today?’ If you don’t understand that, you should never be in franchising.”

My background is in operations. I love the restaurant business. I love everything about it — the people, seeing the people that I hired or mentored through my career grow into senior positions and fostering the next generation that’s going to run this business.

I fell into franchising with a brand called Pollo Campero. I was on a [vice president] of operations, supply chain and training.

I look at mentoring franchisees and getting them to where they want to go, and in my mind, there are two kinds of franchisees: the dreamer, who is very successful in his own field, has a great job and always dreamt of owning his own business, and the investor, who has other brands and wants to expand his portfolio. 

I was with MOOYAH Burgers, Fries and Shakes, where most of our franchisees were dreamers. And I can name three or four of them right now that are multi-unit franchisees and have become investor franchisees. They’re investing in other brands. 

With Layne’s, we’re attracting more of the investor franchisees, and catering to them is very different as you guide them.

1851: It sounds like you’ve been among the magicians in franchising — like you have a blueprint. What does that look like?

Wattar: You need to stabilize a brand. What are we selling? Our customer is not the customer that’s coming into the restaurant and buying chicken fingers. Our customer is an investor or somebody that’s going to put their hard-earned money on the table. Once we stabilize that, we stabilize the brand’s operation systems and supply chain. Make sure you support the franchisees and have a brand voice. Be true and be honest about it.

Then, the biggest thing is explaining to the leadership or ownership that, as a franchisor, we’re not in the restaurant business. We’re in the service business. Franchisees sign with us for service so they can open their own restaurant and have their own services. That’s a mindset shift because running restaurants is very different from supporting franchisees. 

Part of servicing franchisees is saying no to protect them and protect the brand. I use this example all the time: I have three boys, and I tell them no 3 million times a day. That doesn’t mean I don’t love them. The reason I say no is because I love them, and I want them to be better. It’s the same thing with franchisees.

1851: Why do you think so many franchisors don’t understand this process?

Wattar: In my mind, it’s financials. If you’re desperate to sell franchises, you’re going to say yes to everybody. The key is that you have to say no. You have to be true to yourself, the brand and the other franchisees.

So far, we’ve sold 225 in the last three years that I’ve been with the brand, but I probably said no to another 300 because they’re not going to represent the brand, and my current franchisees will lose confidence in me. 

Somebody asked me, “How are you getting franchisees? Where are you getting your franchisees from?” I tell them, “My restaurants.” My franchisees tell people that we mean what we say. 

Saying no is hard. We’ve said no to big checks, big franchisees. But we knew it was the right thing to do for the brand. We can’t be short-sighted. We get the picture of where we want to be four or five years down the road.

1851: If another brand listens to what you’re saying, can they become un-stalled and grow again?

Wattar: Yes. That hasn’t changed. It’s hard sometimes to look at yourself in the mirror and say, “This is what I’m doing wrong. This is what I need to change.” But your franchisees are your bread and butter. It’s not our brand; franchisees are the ones making the investments, and we need to listen to them before we say, “OK, let’s do this.”

You have to be disciplined. We treat the franchisees as we expect them to treat the Layne’s customer walking in. Different customers, same treatment. You don’t tell your regular customer walking into Layne’s “You’re wrong” or “I’m not going to do this for you.” You figure out how to make it a good experience. If you have a million-dollar store and their royalty is 5%, that franchisee is paying you $50,000 per year. That’s a $50,000 customer; treat them as such.

Registered Franchise States
  • Unavailable Markets
  • Expanding
  • Top Growth Market

READY NOW? LET’S GET STARTED!

When do you envision becoming a franchise owner?
Do you have $300,000 without the bank to invest?

* Not An Offer To Sell a Franchise This website and the information contained on this website is for information purposes only, is not intended as an offer to sell a franchise or a solicitation of an offer to buy a franchise. The offering of a franchise can be made by prospectus only in the form of a Franchise Disclosure Document. In the states of California, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin we will not offer you a franchise unless and until we have complied with applicable pre-sale registration and/or disclosure requirements. In the State of New York, the offering of a franchise can be made only by a prospectus that has been previously filed and registered with the Department of Law of the State of New York. The application for registration of an offering prospectus or the acceptance and filing thereof by the Department of Law does not constitute approval of the offering or the sale of such franchise by the Department of Law or the attorney general of the State of New York.