Don’t Misconstrue Passion for Anger
Don’t Misconstrue Passion for Anger

There is an invisible line in management for both clients and employees; this line separates passion and anger. In a world where everyone’s DNA is made from a different mold, controlling reactions is nearly impossible. While one's best intentions are to inspire and motivate, an employee or client m.....

There is an invisible line in management for both clients and employees; this line separates passion and anger. In a world where everyone’s DNA is made from a different mold, controlling reactions is nearly impossible. While one's best intentions are to inspire and motivate, an employee or client may read passion incorrectly for anger, cockiness or plain rudeness.

My aim in life and business is to live it as close to perfect as possible. While the chances of that happening are the same as Santa sliding down my chimney this Christmas, working toward perfection motivates me. I am encouraged to identify many small wins each day I’m alive, and hope that these small wins will lead me to a more perfect, complete life.

My motivation for perfection in business is a double-edged sword. On one hand, that motivation drives my agency to produce the best results humanly possible for our clients. On the other hand, motivation is often misconstrued and received as high pressure.

To be great, pressure is a requirement. Pressure, in my opinion, should be the inspiration to tackle that to-do list or get on the treadmill in the morning. Pressure, when handled correctly, will motivate.

Some DNA isn’t equipped to handle pressure well though. When the CEO of a company gives a speech about the importance of breaking records and moving a company forward, team members can become stressed and question the motive. When pressure leads to stress, it ultimately demotivates.

This, however, can be resolved. The people that receive the “let’s grow the company” speech wrongly, frankly, are not the right people for that company. It doesn’t make them any less of a person (they would probably pick up a senior’s groceries if the bag broke), it just means their DNA is not a match for that particular company. And that’s OK.

Aligning DNA is not an easy task. DNA creates varying personalities, some click while others clash.  Gauging the responses and reactions to your outspoken passion can ultimately determine the success of your vision.

In life, DNA matches must be worked through. Over and over again. Whether identifying miscommunication in friendships or identifying balance in marriages, people are people. People are different. This means, that while we all want to be alpha males, we can’t. Having the willingness to listen, learn, retain, think, process and respond instantly is critical. When love, between two people or two friends exists, passion should never be misconstrued as anger –simply passion. A passion to make the relationship forever lasting.

In business, this same philosophy should be considered, with one major difference. As an owner of a company, you have no control over those who work with you. Even if you have a contract in place, people are people. In a marriage or friendship, there will be forgiveness. In business, if your passion is misconstrued, it can mean undercover conversations and negative sentiments. This negative expression can ultimately poison another great person, leading to a slew of people who are unhappy and frustrated in the office—even when your intention was to make it perfect for all.

In my business, I push people. Not because I want them to fly off the handle and go tell their work buddy that I am an asshole. More so, because I know what people are capable of. In great businesses, the leadership compiles all the DNA and creates a superpower business. If one of those DNAs starts slipping and is not corrected, the rest of the puzzle can crumble. I get this. But, when I speak, never think I am angry, because I’m not. Know that I am passionate about creating the greatest communications agency that ever existed by crushing it with relationship, service and results every day.

While that vision may be the Santa Claus of Nick Powills, it is a vision that I am passionate about. I want to find the great in every individual that I come across. Whether in a launch meeting with a brand, keynoting a conference, a one-on-one with a teammate or while talking about passion in front of my entire staff – I seek that greatness within.

Additionally, so do many CEOs and leaders. We have a similar DNA, still different, but similar. Of course, greatness reaps greater rewards – but it’s not just about us. We are not being selfish, we just believe in the power of Santa Claus in the workplace. We believe that we can find the magic in everyone we come across, and take all of those small wins and make Ol’ Saint Nick come down the chimney. It’s because we are big dreamers and big believers of greatness. It’s because we are passionate about the ongoing campaign of life. It’s because we care.

 

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